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8 posts categorized "Danish food catering"

December 11, 2013

Sankta Lucia - the festival of light

Swedish Lucia For Dummies from Sweden on Vimeo.

This Friday the 13th December is the day of St Lucia and the festival of light. On this day across Scandinavia you will find processions of boys and girls dressed all in white bearing candles and singing carols. This is usually done in the morning darkness, welcoming the light. 

At the front of each procession is a Lucia Bride, wearing a wreath or crown on her head with four or five candles.

On this day, we drink ‘Glögg’ mulled wine and eat either saffron buns (Lussebullar) or little pancake balls called ‘Æbleskiver’. We also over-do the ginger biscuits. Really, way too many ginger biscuits...

The history of St Lucia can be traced back to St Lucia of Syracuse, a martyr who died in 304 – however, the date of St Lucia is also a pagan date.  It was the darkest night where spirits were free to roam and animals begin to talk. So, light was needed to ward of spirits. today's tradition is a bit of a blend of the two.

On Friday we will be serving Glögg and Saffron buns all day and playing carols on repeat.  

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August 21, 2013

Kransekage / Kransekake - the traditional Nordic celebration cake

Karenskitchen
Kransekage / Kransekake literally means ‘ring cake’. It’s a traditional Norwegian and Danish celebration cake (Weddings, Christenings, New Year’s Eve and National Days… ) made from baked marzipan, shaped into rings and then stacked as high as required. It’s very rich so not much is needed (it’s usually served at the Coffee course – a bit as a petit four).

As you can imagine, a real kransekage is made from pure almond paste (nothing like the cheap stuff used for normal cake decorating). It’s a hard cake to make, taking many hours of shaping, baking and decorating.

We don’t make these at Scandikitchen – but we get asked about these cakes a lot and we recommend our good friend Karen from Karen’s Kitchen.

You can contact Karen’s Kitchen via her facebook page right here or ping her an e-mail.  She's vry nice and super skilled in this department. In fact, she makes great cakes for all occasions. Tell her we said 'Hi'.

If you're thinking of making your own, this is the type of marzipan you need to make the real deal: Click here to buy Anton Berg 60% 'ren rå' marzipan 

December 01, 2012

How to make Flaeskesteg - Roast Pork w crackling

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For a truly Danish Christmas, you have to serve Roast Pork - also known as Flæskesteg.

At Scandi Kitchen, we use a pork loin cut, scored across at 1 cm sections. Ask your butcher to do this as it is quite hard ot get right at home and the cut of the pork is really important to get the right type of crackling.

If you want to be super sure to get it right, we sell frozen pork loins from Denmark (Svinekam) already scored - just defrost and cook. There's a link here to the shop where you can buy these (limited stock).

Flæskesteg - Danish Christmas roast pork

This is the classic Christmas meal in Denmark. This recipe serves four people, at least.

Ingredients:

- 2kg loin of pork with the skin on, and scored all the way down to just before the flesh in lines 1cm apart (ask the butcher to do this if necessary)

- 1 carrot

- 1 onion

- 1 or 2 bay leaves

- 400-500ml boiling water

- few strigs of thyme

Method:

- Preheat your oven to 250°C.

- Place the pork joint skin side down (yes, ‘upside-down’) into a roasting tray. Add just enough boiling water to the tray so that the skin is submerged. 

- Put the pork in the oven for 20 minutes.

- Use a clean tea towel to hold the pork in the roasting tray so you don’t burn yourself while you carefully pour away the water.

- Turn the oven down to 160°C, then flip the pork over so it’s the right way up (skin up), and coat the skin with a generous amount of salt and pepper, making sure you get into the crevices created by the scoring. Be careful of your hands at this point, the pork will be hot! Stick the bay leaves into the crevices as well, then add the carrot, onion and thyme to the roasting tin, and pour 400-500ml fresh, cold water in.

- Put the pork back in the oven for about an hour or until it is done. Check about halfway through to see if you need to top up the water if it’s starting to evaporate too much.

- Using a meat thermometer, check the temperature of the pork after the hour. It should be somewhere between 68-70°C. Pour out the fatty residue into a bowl to use as stock for the gravy.

- Increase the oven temperature back up to 250°C and put the roast pork back in to make the crackling. This can take a good 15 minutes, so use the grill if you want to kickstart the process (but keep a close eye on it, or else you could end up with a burnt crackling).

- Remove the roast from the oven and check the temperature again. It should be between 70-75°C. This should mean it isn’t overcooked - pork can be terribly boring if you have to gnaw your way through it.

- Let the roast rest uncovered for about 10 minutes. While that’s happening, make the gravy from the fat and stock - use gravy browning if required.

Brunkartofler - Caramelised potatoes

A traditional accompaniment to Danish roast pork.  It's a bit sweet so we only eat these once a year.

Ingredients:

- 85g sugar

- 25g butter

- 1kg peeled and cooked small new potatoes (don’t be afraid to use tinned potatoes for this) - must be COLD.

Method:

- Add the sugar to a cold frying pan and spread it evenly across the bottom. Melt it on a high heat while you stir for about 2 minutes, then turn the heat down to medium while you add the butter. Turn up the heat to high again.

- Put the potatoes in a colander or sieve and run them under a cold tap, then add to the pan. As you can imagine, it’s going to splutter and spit a bit, so be careful.

- Get the potatoes covered in caramel and brown them for between 4-6 minutes, turning them carefully. If it looks like they’re getting a bit too dry, add a drop of water (again, take care doing this).

- Serve the caramelised potatoes along with normal boiled potatoes - as these are very sweet, they’re more of an extra side dish for the pork rather than a replacement for potatoes altogether.

NOTE: Always use potatoes that are completely cold. If you’re preparing them yourself, peel and cook them the day before. Each potato should be about 3-4cm in size - think salad potatoes. Tinned really is a good option for this dish.

Serve with warm, red cabbage.

Leftovers? Make Pyt-i-Panna.

November 05, 2012

Trine Hahnemann's Scandi Christmas courses

Familybakingskandi
As you know, we love Trine.  She's ace.  

We're super excited to be able to help spread the word about her Scandi Christmas Cooking Courses at Food52 in Islington - she is hosting both Scandi Baking and Christmas entertaining.

There's also a course that offers parents a chance to bake with their children - a really wonderful idea and the perfect pre-Christmas gift.

More info right here

Quote Scandi Kitchen when you book and get 20% off the course price.

Trine will also be at Scandi Kitchen on 15th November to sign books and have a chit chat if you fancy popping along.  We'll put the glogg on.

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September 14, 2012

What’s “Scandinavian Pastry” with Quark?

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What’s “Scandinavian Pastry” with Quark?

Ah, The Great British Bake-off.  We love that show.  Last week, one of the contestants made Wellington using what he described as “Scandinavian Pastry” because it was made with butter and Quark.  Since then, we've had quite a number of questions relating to Quark.

While the jury is out – in our humble Nordic opinion – about how Scandinavian this particular pastry is, it is very true that we use a lot of Quark in our cooking.

What is Quark?

It’s a cheese, technically.  It is also known as Curd Cheese.  The Swedes sell it under the brand name of “Kesella” (but this is a brand only – it is simply Quark).  The French tend to call is Fromage Frais.  Yes, we know:  Fromage frais is sold as a yoghurt here with cream added so it is no longer low fat, so it is slightly confusing.  Want to be even more confused?  It’s technically the same as Skyr too, that Icelandic yoghurt that everybody who’s ever been to Iceland can’t get out of their head and pre-order from us by the case load whenever we can get hold of it (the UK version tastes different mainly because of the food the cows eat).    Quark is extremely popular in Eastern European cooking as well as Russian cooking.

Confused yet?  So are we.  Let’s say it is a dairy product that is high in protein and naturally low in fat – but super creamy and extremely filling.  It has slightly sour notes but works extremely well with fruit – and also in cooking.

Here are five different ways you can use Quark in your food – a natural way to keep things low fat. 

  1.  Makes a really good dressing for salads – keeping them creamy whilst still being naturally low fat.  Mix the Quark with spices and herbs to use as dips for crudités.
  2. Quark is great for cheesecake.  Replace part of the full fat cream cheese in the American cheesecakes with quark to lighten the calories.
  3. Mix Quark and crème fraiche and the seeds from half a vanilla pod and a bit of lemon zest.  Use as topping for fresh fruit salad.
  4. Use Quark to thicken up sauces – just add to sauces and casseroles instead of crème fraiche or cream.
  5. Use Quark in baking – for example, when baking buns or Saffran Lucia buns (lussebullar).  You can replace some of the liquid with equal quantities of Quark. 

All major UK supermarkets stock quark – as do most Eastern European stores. 

At Scandi Kitchen, we stock Icelandic style SKYR– but pre-orders only.  Mail shop@scandikitchen.co.uk if you want to go on the Skyr Mailing List to be notified of when we get stock in.

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December 05, 2010

WE ARE OPEN TODAY SUNDAY 5th DECEMBER

Morning.

Just checking in to see if we're open?  Oh yes we are - from 11 till 17.  And yes, we have glogg (Blossa mulled wine) and yes we have hams, julebrus, julmust, remoulade, flaeskesteg, aebleskiver, risengrod, cherry sauce...  Everything.

Today we'll be doing a special Sunday Menu of Christmas Platters (choose from Danish or Swedish) for £9.95.  

Desserts today are Ris a la mandes with cherry sauce, Kladdkaka, lussekatter, cinnamon buns, cranberry and orange cake with spiced drizzle, seasonal tart and our amazing banana cake.

See you at the shop soon.  Don't be late.

Oh, and yes, so far, there are still parking spaces just outside the shop.  So get in that car pronto.

Rebekka, Bronte, Astrid and Lovely Emilia xxx

 

May 19, 2009

New Scandinavian Potatoes - coming in June

We bet your Mum always told you to eat up your potatoes when you were a kid.   Ours certainly did – not that we minded, especially in the summer when the potatoes were new, fresh and from the farm down the road. 

Today, the taste of Scandinavian summer still starts with the first new potatoes of the year, boiled and dressed in melted butter and chopped parsley.   Perhaps the taste of summer to you is Midsummer’s eve, eating matjes herring with potatoes, chopped chives and crème fraiche...  Either way, it is the taste of home for most of us.  And yes, they DO taste different than English potatoes.

Either way, good news:  we’ll be stocking Scandinavian potatoes again this year.  Not in great amounts, mind you, so if you’re clever, you let us know if you are interested so we can make sure we order enough for you.  We’ll have Swedish potatoes and we’ll also stock some nice potatoes from West Zealand in Denmark (from some nice farmer down the road from Bronte’s mum and dad’s house.  They have an annoying dog that barks all the time and the farmer himself has a scary mono-brow, but man, they grow nice tatties).

They’ll come in early June, in time for Midsummer parties...  Prices depends on local seasonal prices, we’ll keep you posted.

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May 05, 2009

Scandinavian Kitchen catering

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Did you know we also do catering?  Indeed, we serve lots of fantastic companies across the capital with Scandinavian food - from traditional open sandwiches to lighter snack lunches to canapes and breakfast meetings. 

It is not only Scandinavian companies that use our services - we've catered for hundreds of different companies, from the BBC to film production companies and banks such as Goldman Sachs - and big events like "the International Wine Challenge".  We count all the Scandinavian Embassies and Chambers of Commerce amongst our customers - as well as big companies such as Bang & Olufson, Kvadrat, Handelsbanken and many, many others.  On top of that we have lots of regular private customers who use our services catering for big family events and parties.

In a recent survey to our customers, 100% said they would use us again.  (Parp, parp, that was our trumpet blowing.)

If you fancy chatting to us about our catering, give us a ring or send a mail to iwantfood@scandikitchen.co.uk and we'll get back to you promptly. 

Party catering can be bespoke - as is breakfast meetings and buffets.  Here's a taster of our lovely open sandwiches and canapes (again, we can amend to suit your particular event):

For canape suggestions click here  and for open sandwiches click here

'I used the Scandinavian kitchen delivery for an important presentation to clients and everyone absolutely loved it! The food was great quality and the presentation prefect! We are a Danish company so it was complete package! Thanks again, Julie at www.egecarpet.com"Excellent canapes. Good service from staff prior to event and canapes delivered on time.

"Excellent canapes. Good service from staff prior to event and canapes delivered on time."

"The food was excellent and there was only a couple of pieces leftover.  Everyone said how good it was.  We will definitely use you again. 
Sally at DnB NOR Bank ASA"

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tags: danish, food, catering, swedish, norwegian, london, corporate

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