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24 posts categorized "Norsk mat"

May 07, 2014

18 ways to be more Norwegian

We'll be celebrating Norwegian Constitution Day on 17th May along with the rest of Norway - so we thought we'd make a little selection of ways you can be more Norwegian:

 

1. When you 'gå på tur' (go for a hike) you always bring a Kvikk Lunsj and an orange. And you never,  EVER, allow anyone who isn't Norwegian to call your Kvikk Lunsj a 'Kit-Kat'.

Kvikklunsj 

 

2. Eat brunost. Enthuse about brunost. Wonder why no one else eats a brown cheese made from whey that looks like brown Plasticine but tastes of caramel and sheer happiness when sliced and put on top of warm waffles that you've made yourself in your heart-shaped waffle iron using batter you keep in your fridge for every occasion that requires waffles.

Vaffel_ost_wilfa

 

3. Eat a frozen pizza called the Grandiosa. Enthuse about a frozen pizza called the Grandiosa. The Grandiosa is the best pizza ever. Italy has nothing on the Grandiosa. Nothing.

F-Brødtekst-grandiosa

 

4. Sweden is good for one thing - the fleske-safari (meat safari). Meat is cheaper in Sweden, so it's worth crossing that border for meat. And booze. And everything else. Everything is cheaper in Sweden.

   Border

 

5. Sweden will never be better than Norway at anything. Apart from the price of everything. But of that you shall never speak openly.

  Swedes

(Denmark will never be better than Norway at anything. Apart from its easy availability of booze. Which you can talk about).  

 

6. Wear cool genser jumpers like this. Perfect for occasions such as being in temperatures of -20, Eurovision, fishing and crossing the border to acquire meat.

Jumper

 

7. Wear the 'bunad' national dress as if you were born in it. Yes, it itches, but that's part of the charm. You'll keep telling yourself. A lot.

Bunad

8. If you're well known for something, become a Norgesvenn - a famous friend of Norway. Norgesvenner in the past included the late Roald Dahl and Leroy from Fame. Today, Linda Evans from Dynasty, Bonnie Tyler and A1 have the honour.

Linda

 

9. In the summer, partake in a ‘Grillfest’. For this you should wear a ‘Grilldress’, which is a shellsuit in bright colours. Also required: curly hair and a fake moustache, plus socks and sandals. Harry Enfield's Scousers are your style icons.

  Grilldress

 

10. Celebrate Taco Friday at home. Every Friday. Unless you’re having Grandiosa, then it’s okay not to have Tacos. TACOS!

SecondColumn

 

11. Eat boiled sheep’s head, dried lamb sticks or cod preserved in lye. And fermented trout - that you should also get down with. 

  Smalahoved-kalrotstappe

 

12. Hyttetur. Every weekend, go to a cabin. Any cabin. If you don’t have a cabin near a fjord, go to your garden shed, even if you live in a bedsit in Hackney. Also, on the way, make sure to repeat point 1. (If you're in Hackney, we sell Kvikk Lunsj at ScandiKitchen.)  Use motivating sentences such as 'Ut på tur, aldri sur' (literally: 'out on a hike, never angry').

  Hytte

 

13. Every summer, go to Syden for two weeks vacation. This basically just means ‘The South’. Copenhagen counts. Or Oslo, if you're from Trondheim.

Syden

 

14. Use the term ‘Utepils’, meaning ‘to sit outside and have a beer, even if the sun just came out four minutes ago’. We do that here in the UK too, but we don't have the word for it.

Utepils

Utepils Photo Richard Sagen 

 

15. Flags. Celebrate your flag, every day of the year and especially on 17th May. On this day, purchase seven more flags to your collection. Wave them all around. 

7012961-norske-flag

 

16. Norwegians are born with skis on their feet. Uncomfortable for the mothers, but useful once they learn to stand up and navigate down snow covered mountains. If you can’t ski, don’t move to Norway.

  Snow baby skiing

 

17. Enjoy your hotdog wrapped in a potato pancake. It's a thing.

Hotdog

 

And finally: 17th May - 'Syttende Mai'. 

Celebrate Norway's national day on 17th May. No exceptions.

You are proud of Norway. 17th May is the most important day of the year, better than Christmas, birthday and Eurovision put together. The Norwegian Constitution Day is a day celebrated by all Norwegians and Norgesvenner (see above).

Get up, eat Norwegian food, wear a bunad (see above) sing songs about how much you love Norway. Wave flags around a lot. Ice cream. Waffles (see above). Brown cheese (see above). Repeat. Follow with alcohol (possibly purchased in Sweden). Forget how you got home, but wake up loving Norway even more than before.

Happy 17th May, everybody - see you at the ScandiKitchen or the park.

17.mai_london 

April 17, 2014

Easy Easter Smorgasbord - a guide

Smörgasbord-0-10_original (1)


A traditional smörgåsbord doesn’t have to be complicated. It is, in essence, the Nordic version of a buffet, so as long as you follow a few traditional rules and know when to eat which bit, you won’t go wrong. We basically have the same smörgåsbord for every high season, with a few seasonal dish changes.

This version is designed so that you can shop and put it together in a morning, provided you’re organised about the whole thing. For this reason, we have provided UK supermarket equivalents for some ingredients, but if you do have time, pop by our shop and pick up the authentic Nordic essentials or make everything from scratch if you want to impress.

The basics

How to serve and arrange a smörgåsbord.

Laying the table: Arrange in the middle of the table or, if serving for many people, at a side serving table. Served as a lunch and should take around 2-3 hours to eat. The focus here is on slow eating and drinking, with much talking and being together.

Drinks: Lagers such as Tuborg and Carlsberg will provide authenticity – but any good bottled lager is fine. Wine is fine, but less traditional (wine really doesn’t go with herring and shots of aquavit).

Aquavit (aka snaps): We recommend shots of a good, super-chilled OP Andersson or Ålborg. Crisp and strong, they’re perfect partners for pickled herring. If you can’t get hold of aquavit, you can use chilled Absolut Vodka. Leave the bottle in the freezer for a good few hours before serving in shot glasses.

How to arrange the dishes

If arranging on a separate buffet table (recommended for 15 people or more), always arrange the fish at one end, starting with the herring, followed by any other fish dishes. Follow it with cold meats, then warm meats, side dishes and finally bread and butter. Cheese can be placed by the bread section or served separately at the end as a cheese board. Dessert is not brought out until the main smörgåsbord has been eaten. If arranging the food where people are sitting around a table, add all fish dishes first, then cold meats. Bring out any warm dishes as needed. The main thing is to let your guests know that they have to:

1) Always start with herring and aquavit (butter some rye bread or crisp bread, add a few slices of herring on top, eat with a knife and fork, drink a shot of aquavit, and everybody cheers together).

2) Once the herring is eaten, enjoy any other cold fish dishes – from prawns to salmon, egg with roe, and so on. Make your own little open sandwiches on the plate, but always use knife and fork. Never hands!

3) Sliced meats are next, and so on. Then repeat.

4) Warm dishes come next!

5) Replenish as you see fit throughout. We graze for hours, going back to our favourite sections again and again.

Plate arrangement

Arrange each seating with a large plate for main part of the meal and one small plate on top, for herring only. Herring has a very strong flavour, so once everybody’s done with it, the first plates are usually collected so the rest of the meal isn’t herring-flavoured. If you hate washing up or simply just love meatballs that taste of herring, knock yourself out.

Singing

We do like to sing a few songs as we drink our snaps. These are called ‘Snaps-visor’. After a couple of shots of aquavit, it is generally accepted that most people speak fluent Danish, even if they come from Middlesbrough and the closest they have been to Copenhagen is watching The Killing. Plenty of songs to be found on the internet. If you don’t fancy trying real Nordic songs, just pretend to be the Swedish Chef from the Muppets.

Every family has they own version and way to make a smörgåsbord. This is our version – make changes as you see fit. There is no smörgåsbord police (there might be smörgåsbord police in Sweden, actually).

ScandiKitchen’s Easy Easter Smörgåsbord for six people

Two kinds of herring

  • 1 jar of ABBA Mustard herring
  • 1 jar of ABBA Onion herring

Waitrose and Ocado have good versions of pickled herring, but don’t go for rollmops, as those are too sour.

Prawns and boiled eggs

6 hard boiled eggs, halved, placed on a serving dish. Add a bit of mayonnaise on each egg half and top with good quality prawns

Smoked salmon with lemon

Arrange about 60-70g of smoked salmon per person on a serving tray. Decorate with lemon wedges and a bit of fresh dill

Gravadlax Salad

Fold together in a bowl the following:

  • 200g gravlax cured salmon cut into bite size pieces
  • 150g cooked, cooled, sliced new potatoes
  • 100g blanched asparagus cut in pieces
  • A handful of green peas
  • 100g cooked, cooled green beans
  • 8-10 halved cherry tomatoes
  • 1-2 tablespoons of dill and mustard sauce

Arranged on a serving tray, top with chopped chives

Dill & mustard sauce:

You can make your own or get it at our place.

Most UK supermarkets have some form of it too these days.

Sliced and cold meats tray

6 slices of good quality ham

12 slices of Danish salami (or whichever you prefer)

Pork liver pâté – we love Stryhn’s or Per I Viken, but you can go for a good quality UK version too – just keep it smooth.

Warm dishes

Meatballs. Always meatballs.

Make your own, or use a ‘Swedish Meatball’ variety from the supermarket to keep it simple

In Sweden, we also eat a lot of ‘prinskorv’ mini sausages (heated).

We stock these, but you can get frankfurters in supermarket and cut to smaller pieces and serve alongside the meatballs

Where’s the lamb?

We actually don’t eat much lamb on the Easter buffet table. We agree that this does seem like a bit of an oversight. If you want lamb, have lamb. Make a small lamb roast and serve alongside the warm dishes. Lamb goes well with Jansson’s Temptation

Additional Side dishes

Choose as many of these to make as you fancy… (you do not need to make them all)

Beetroot Salad

  • 300g jar of drained beetroot, chopped
  • Mix with mayonnaise and crème fraîche until you have a pink creamy mixture.
  • Add salt, pepper, lemon juice (and sugar, if too tart). Leave to set.

Cheat: Ocado sells real ScandiKitchen Beetroot Salad. As do we in the shop

New potato salad

  • 500g of new potatoes, cooked and cooled.
  • Mix with a simple vinaigrette and chopped red onion.

Cheat: Buy a potato salad, but not the type drenched in mayonnaise

Jansson’s Temptation (warm)

A potato and cream gratin made with Swedish Grebbestads Ansjovis

(NEVER anchovies - this is one dish where no alternatives will suffice) and cream

(approx. 1 hour prep time)

Cheat: Get a potato gratin at the supermarket. Add small amount of chopped Grebbestads Ansjovis before baking

Västerbotten Paj (warm)

Swedish cheese quiche (1 hour prep time plus pasty making)

Cheat: Buy a good quality cheese quiche

Skagenröra (Swedish seafood salad)

  • 200g prawns and 200g crayfish trails, mix with chopped chives and chopped dill
  • Add a gentle helping of mayonnaise
  • Salt, pepper, finely chopped shallot. Combine.
  • Cheat: Add some chives and seasoning to a prawn mayonnaise.

Gubbröra (Egg and fish salad)

  • 3 hard-boiled eggs, chopped
  • Finely chopped shallot onion
  • 6 chopped fillets of Swedish Grebbestads Ansjovis
  • OR chopped matjes herring (as preferred)
  • Chopped chives, pepper.

Mix together. Serve in a bowl.

If you prefer a creamier version, add a dollop of crème fraîche.

Egg & Roe 

Arranged sliced, boiled eggs on a serving tray. Top with either Kalle’s Kaviar (creamed cod roe, in a tube, available in the shop or at Ocado)

or

Dollops of lumpfish roe kaviar and finely chopped shallot onion.

Sauces, pickles, dressings (As needed).

Bowls of pickled cucumber, sliced pickled beetroot, Mustards, mayonnaises, remoulade. And whatever condiments you fancy.

Bread

  • Selection of crisp bread (we love Leksands and Pyramid from the shop)
  • Selection of sliced rye bread
  • Crusty white bread
  • Butter
  •  

Cheese selection

Our ideal cheese selection would be:

  • Västerbotten cheese (Our place, Waitrose, Ocado)
  • Norwegian Brown Cheese (our place, Ocado)
  • Riberhus Danish cheese (our place)

A good quality blue cheese

Cheat: Get whatever cheese you like.

Dessert (optional)

Cloudberry Mess

Arrange in each serving glass:

  • 1 lightly crushed meringue nest
  • 1 dollop of whipped cream
  • 1 scoop of good vanilla ice cream
  • Heat up some cloudberry jam – and pour 1 tbsp. hot jam on top just before serving.

December 11, 2013

Sankta Lucia - the festival of light

Swedish Lucia For Dummies from Sweden on Vimeo.

This Friday the 13th December is the day of St Lucia and the festival of light. On this day across Scandinavia you will find processions of boys and girls dressed all in white bearing candles and singing carols. This is usually done in the morning darkness, welcoming the light. 

At the front of each procession is a Lucia Bride, wearing a wreath or crown on her head with four or five candles.

On this day, we drink ‘Glögg’ mulled wine and eat either saffron buns (Lussebullar) or little pancake balls called ‘Æbleskiver’. We also over-do the ginger biscuits. Really, way too many ginger biscuits...

The history of St Lucia can be traced back to St Lucia of Syracuse, a martyr who died in 304 – however, the date of St Lucia is also a pagan date.  It was the darkest night where spirits were free to roam and animals begin to talk. So, light was needed to ward of spirits. today's tradition is a bit of a blend of the two.

On Friday we will be serving Glögg and Saffron buns all day and playing carols on repeat.  

Lucia_i_Tivoli_805340a

November 29, 2013

Recipe: Lussebullar (Lucia Saffron buns)

No December in Sweden and Norway is complete without the delicious Lussebullar - a soft saffron bun. Perfect with Glogg mulled wine.

There are many, many different ways to make these buns. Some people add Kesella or quark to the mixture (it makes a more moist bun) - if you choose to do this, replace half the milk with quark or Kesella and follow the recipe as normal, except you add the quark when adding the soft butter.

Note: Our recipe uses ground saffron powder. It can be hard to get hold of in the UK - so if you use strands, gently grind them in a pestle & mortar and infuse them in the warm milk before using. 

Click here to download the pdf of the recipe 

1311_lussebullar1-1

 

November 21, 2013

Nordic Christmas Markets 2013 - this weekend 22, 23, 24 November

Julemarkede1

This week and weekend is on of the biggest in the Nordic ex-pat calendar. It’s the week of the Christmas Fairs.

We support these fairs wholeheartedly and we absolutely love going along and help if we can. The different organisation and Churches play a very important role to all Nordic ex-pats both for general support, religious support, as a meeting point, cultural centres and just simply nice places to be and visit.

Here’s the low down for this weekend’s markets in London:

Swedish Church Christmas Fair - Marylebone

A really wonderful and warm welcome to all at the Swedish Church in Harcourt Street. Open Thursday till 20:00 and all day Saturday and Sunday. We specifically recommend the traditional Glögg mulled wine, a secret recipe by The Reverend Mikael Persson, the Swedish Priest. Heavenly (Excuse the pun). We went to the pre-view yesterday and got our hands on Pippi Longstocking umbrellas and fancy knitted kid's strawberry hats!

Swedish Church is on Harcourt Street W1 - directions here www.swedishchurch.com

Norwegian Church Christmas Fair - Rotherhide

Everything from waffles to lompe, mulled wine and a lot of Norwegian ‘Jule’ cheer. The Norwegian Church in Rotherhide is a huge cultural centre for all things Norwegian – and Norwegian people and friends of Norway. The food market is huge and bulging with goodies.

ScandiKitchen will have a stand right outside the Norwegian Church where we will be serving hot mulled wine.

Sjømannskirkens Julebasar is on 22-24 November 10:00-18:00

How to get to the Norwegian Church (nearest tube Rotherhide) click here

Danish KFUK YMCA Christmas Bazaar – Hampstead

This event is a pilgrimage for a lot of ex pat Danes every year. It’s extremely busy and packed but worth a trip – they have everything from hotdogs to Christmas beers and real Danish ‘hygge’ feelings. They do a lot of decorations too – from calendar advent candles to ceramics so you can pick up a few prezzie.

Dansk KFUK’s Julebazar is on 23/24 November 10-17.  Find the Danish Bazar here

The Finnish Church in London Christmas Market

A warm welcome and genuine Christmas cheer awaits you at the Finnish Church in Rotherhide – everything from ‘squeaky cheese’ and Rye pastries with egg (Karelian Pies) and cinnamon buns as well as a huge food market. Open all this week until Sunday at 17:00.

ScandiKitchen will be there as we are part of the Scandi Christmas Market taking place between the Norwegian and Finnish church – so pop over and see us.

Nearest tube is Rotherhide; here’s a map Click here

Scandinavian Christmas Market 2013

Scan Events are doing the Scandi Christmas Market again this year in Rotherhide, outside the Finnish and Norwegian Churches.  Open Fri, Sat and Sun all day – pop by and say hello to us, we’ll also be there, selling hotdogs and warm mulled wine. Say hi to our team: Marte, Linnea, Jonas, Little Jonas, Torben and Kaisla.

More about Scandinavian Christmas Market here

Scandianavian_christmas_images

 

September 10, 2013

Sweet dreams are made of cheese (a mini-guide to Scandinavian cheeses)

Lagring-ost-480x300

Many of us have memories of sitting in a field on a summer’s day eating crusty French bread and sharing a kilo of creamy brie.  In fact, some of us would like to spend most of our days doing just that, if it was not for the eventual need to then be moved around by a pick-up truck.

Less people have such glorious thoughts when thinking about Scandinavian cheese – in fact, most people associate Scandinavian cheese with Eurovision.  Except those of us who know just how many amazing cheeses actually come from our northern corner of the world.

Even back in the days when old Harold Bluetooth was a nipper and busy taking over the world, the Scandinavians made cheese.  In fact, the old Vikings had a diet rich in milk, butter and cheese and are even said to have found cheese to be a sexual stimulant.

Here’s a guide to some of the top Scandinavian cheeses

1.  Gammelost (Old cheese)
A recipe dating back to the Viking times, “Old cheese” needed very little help to mature.  Most people say both taste and smell resembles something that has spent a few months inside a sweaty old sock.  As you know, nothing pleases a true tyrophile more than a slice of stinky old sock. Admittedly, perhaps due to the taste, younger Norwegians are falling out of love with it, even if it is does have the nickname of Norwegian Viagra.

2.  Danablu (Danish Blue)
We had to include this as it is the most popular export and it is a darn fine cheese.  Invented originally to emulate Roquefort, and quickly making its own mark on the cheese scene, Danablu has a sharp, salty note and is excellent served on just about any kind of bread. Mash it with a bit of syrup to change its character and use it to spread on crisp bread, topped with some sunflower seeds – it really works.  Swedes tend to love blue cheese on ginger biscuits (we say don’t argue with anyone who invented Billy bookcases, Volvos and the zipper).

3.  Brunost (Brown cheese) 
Comes in many different varieties: the two best known are the Gudbrandsdalen (cow and goat) and Ekte Gjeitost (pure goat); the latter is the connoisseur’s choice

Okay, so it’s an acquired taste, but, on average, Norwegians eat about 4 kilos each of this stuff a year so there must be something to it.  It’s as Norwegian as trolls and fjords.  It looks a bit like a block of plasticine, tastes a bit like caramel and is enjoyed on its own, on open sandwiches or with freshly baked waffles:  all you need then is a patterned jumper and people will soon start calling you Haakon.

4.  Rygeost (smoked cheese)
A very Danish invention that is never exported due to its very short shelf life.  Unmatured, smoked cheese made from buttermilk and milk and turned in less than 24 hours, after which it is smoked very quickly over a mixture of straw and nettle and topped with caraway seeds.  This cheese is simply amazing, light and divine eaten on a piece of rye bread.  Resembles a firm ricotta in texture.

5. Vasterbotten
If ABBA is the queen of cheese, Vasterbotten is the king.  A firm, crumbly, aged Swedish cheese not unlike parmesan in smell but with immense flavour and character.  This cheese is a welcome addition to any cheeseboard and is also a partner to any crayfish party.  Can also be used to make the excellent Vasterbotten pie.

6. Hushallsost 
A cheese that has a name that translates as “household cheese” sounds like it belongs on a value shelf in a corner shop in Hackney, but it is actually an excellent cheese.  Mild, creamy, full of holes, this cheese is usually a big hit with the younger generation.  Hushallsost is one of six Swedish food products with a so-called TSG protection (one other cheese, Svecia, also holds this distinction).  Taste-wise it is a bit like the Danish Havarti cheese in texture (the Danes’ favourite and widely available in the UK), although less creamy.  Produced by Arla, Havarti is called Aseda Graddost in Sweden.  In Finland, the Turunmaa cheese is what is closest to Havarti in taste.

7.  Gamle Ole (Old Ole)
A sliceable mature Danish cheese, this baby stinks.  Don’t touch it too much or your fingers will honk all day.  The taste, however, is really lush.  Also known in Denmark as Danbo 45, there are many varieties in the same vein:  ‘Sorte Sara’ is a good version too.  A superb finish to any smorgasbord, eat a slice or two on sourdough bread topped with some lingon jam.  Other excellent strong Danes include Esrom 45 as well as Viggo Mortensen (he’s not a cheese, but he sure looks very strong).

8.  Präst ost (Priest cheese)
Sweden’s most popular cheese.  It was given its name because the farmers at the time it was invented could pay their church taxes in dairy products.   Präst ost comes in many varieties, from the mild to the mature and flavoured with anything from vodka to whisky.

9. Leipäjuusto (also known as “squeaky cheese”)
This is a fresh young cheese from Finland.  The milk is curdled and set into a flat round shape, then baked.  In the olden days it was dried for months and people put it on the fire to re-activate it.  The name comes from the sound it makes when you bite into it.  The taste is not unlike feta.

10. Rejeost (Prawn cheese)
For some reason, spreadable prawn cheese is immensely popular across all of Scandinavia.  Not really a great cheese from a connoisseur’s point of view, but surely any product that manages to combine cheese and prawns and make it taste good needs a mention.  If cheese and prawn can be coupled in peaceful harmony, then there’s hope for world peace.

Shop for cheese here 

April 29, 2013

Tell all the Norwegians... Hotdogs: Pølse med Lompe this Friday and Saturday

If there is one thing we know it is that Norwegians miss the hotdogs from home.  Good old 'polser' sausages, wrapped in a Lompe potato lefse type pancake.  Stuffed with cripsy onions, ketchup and mustard.

Best enjoyed with a Solo soft drink - or a cold beer.

Friday and Saturday this week (3rd and 4th May 2013) we're kick-starting our 'We Love Norway' month with special Norwegian hotdogs on sale.

Get both a cold Tuborg beer or Solo AND a hotdog for just £5.  We're wondering if you can find the same offer cheaper in Oslo? Do let us know.  

Lompe12

November 23, 2012

Scandinavian Christmas Markets 2012 - (23,24,25 Nov 2012)

Julebasar_2011_fredag_152_primary 2

It's the weeked for ALL the Scandi Christmas Markets in London

(23rd, 24th and 25th November 2012)

Swedish Church, Harcourt Street, London - Sat and Sun 11-6 (sat), 12-5 (sun) LINK HERE

Norwegian Church, St Olav's Square, Rotherhide 11-5 (Fri), 10-6 (Sat), 12-4 (Sun) LINK HERE

Finnish Church in London LONTOON SUOMALAINEN MERIMIESKIRKKO, Rotherhide 12-8 (Fri), 10-6 (Sat), 11-5 (Sun) - also continues through out next week LINK HERE

Danish YMCA Julemarked 43 Maresfield Gardens, Hampstead, 11-5 (Sat), 10-4 (Sun) LINK HERE

The Scandinavian Christmas Market - Outdoor market with loads of Scandi stalls, foods, presents, krims krams and nice hyggelige people  - Rotherhide, outside Finnish and Norwegian Church (yes, we're there, selling mulled wine and gingrbread dough, biscuits, delicato and more) LINK HERE

All a bit too much?  Pop by our shop. We'll put the coffee on, save you a piece of cake and always have time for a few hugs.  We're open as normal 10-18 Saturday and 10-17 Sunday.

God Jul x

Swedi

Scandianavian_christmas_top

September 14, 2012

What’s “Scandinavian Pastry” with Quark?

B01mm1hm

What’s “Scandinavian Pastry” with Quark?

Ah, The Great British Bake-off.  We love that show.  Last week, one of the contestants made Wellington using what he described as “Scandinavian Pastry” because it was made with butter and Quark.  Since then, we've had quite a number of questions relating to Quark.

While the jury is out – in our humble Nordic opinion – about how Scandinavian this particular pastry is, it is very true that we use a lot of Quark in our cooking.

What is Quark?

It’s a cheese, technically.  It is also known as Curd Cheese.  The Swedes sell it under the brand name of “Kesella” (but this is a brand only – it is simply Quark).  The French tend to call is Fromage Frais.  Yes, we know:  Fromage frais is sold as a yoghurt here with cream added so it is no longer low fat, so it is slightly confusing.  Want to be even more confused?  It’s technically the same as Skyr too, that Icelandic yoghurt that everybody who’s ever been to Iceland can’t get out of their head and pre-order from us by the case load whenever we can get hold of it (the UK version tastes different mainly because of the food the cows eat).    Quark is extremely popular in Eastern European cooking as well as Russian cooking.

Confused yet?  So are we.  Let’s say it is a dairy product that is high in protein and naturally low in fat – but super creamy and extremely filling.  It has slightly sour notes but works extremely well with fruit – and also in cooking.

Here are five different ways you can use Quark in your food – a natural way to keep things low fat. 

  1.  Makes a really good dressing for salads – keeping them creamy whilst still being naturally low fat.  Mix the Quark with spices and herbs to use as dips for crudités.
  2. Quark is great for cheesecake.  Replace part of the full fat cream cheese in the American cheesecakes with quark to lighten the calories.
  3. Mix Quark and crème fraiche and the seeds from half a vanilla pod and a bit of lemon zest.  Use as topping for fresh fruit salad.
  4. Use Quark to thicken up sauces – just add to sauces and casseroles instead of crème fraiche or cream.
  5. Use Quark in baking – for example, when baking buns or Saffran Lucia buns (lussebullar).  You can replace some of the liquid with equal quantities of Quark. 

All major UK supermarkets stock quark – as do most Eastern European stores. 

At Scandi Kitchen, we stock Icelandic style SKYR– but pre-orders only.  Mail shop@scandikitchen.co.uk if you want to go on the Skyr Mailing List to be notified of when we get stock in.

54697a242de2418591c69a2164318dd8_470x296_Luciaboller-med-fuldkorn

May 03, 2012

17 Mai 2012 - Norwegian National Day London

Krndef-norge17mai

Think St Patrick’s Day is cool?  Then you’ll also enjoy Norwegian National Day, except everything is blue, red and white instead.  Oh, and less Guinness.  Possibly a bit more aquavit instead.  And waffles.

Norwegian constitution day is celebrated on 17th May every year and Norwegians across the world come out of the wood work, adorn their national costumes and get together to celebrate.

In London, these celebrations take place all over – but start in Southwark Park at 9:00 with the hoisting of the Norwegian flag.  There’s dancing, there’s music, there’s hotdogs and there are sure to be an abundance of waffles with or without brown cheese.

You can find the whole programme for 17th May (17. Mai i London 2012) right here

At our Great Titchfield Store we’ll be celebrating Norway too – with flags, cakes and tasters – so pop on down to see us.

We’re expecting our full Norway National Day delivery on 10th May so that is when you need to get ordering via our online shop www.scandikitchen.co.uk/shop to ensure your stash in time for the celebrations.

Norway1

March 27, 2012

Tine MILLOM - new brunost / brown cheese from Norway

It's very exciting: the first new brown cheese to hit the market in Norway for many years.

It's milder than the "standard" brunost - but a bit stronger than flotemysost (the lightest kind).

We've got it in stock in the London store from tomorrow, Wednesday 28th March 2012.

NORWAY delivery just in. 'Choice bro', says Kiwi Andy.

Andy has been unpacking pallets all morning.  Andy is our Kiwi who takes charge of all things online shop.  He's super nice and we're busy turning him Nordic.

He's told us (say the following in a New Zealand accent to make it authentic) that we've got heaps of:

Walter's Mandler - salty milk chocolate, totally awesome, bro. 

Solo - the traditional Norwegian orange soft drink.  Also awesome, bro.

Smorbukk is back, we've got Mill's Kaviar, Mayonnaise and remoulade, we've got so much Brown Cheese in so many different varieties that we could open a shop.  Wait, we have.  Oh.

Melkesjokolade, Bergen's fiskesuppe, kvikklunsj and much much more.  

Click here to be taken to our shopping area - next day delivery for orders placed before 14:00.   Free delivery over £60.  We deliver to all mainland Uk and can send a limited selection of dry goods to the EU too.

CLICK HERE TO SHOP NOW

If you are unsure of how to tackle a New Zealand accent, here's a helpful clip from the interknit.

March 08, 2012

Waffle on and on and on - for Waffle Day 2012

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We Scandinavians can lay claim to having invented many things.  From the zipper to the paper clip, we have had our fair share of useful inventions over the past many years.  Long boats, Clapping hats and ABBA too, those we can claim as our own.  Still, there is one thing very dear to all Scandinavian people’s hearts that we have to credit the Belgians for:  the invention of the humble waffle.

In short, a waffle is just a batter that is baked in a waffle iron and eaten, just as it is, or topped with various delights.  The waffle actually stems from way back in the middle ages, where it was a batter that was baked between two plates of metal, over a hot stove and flipped over to cook evenly – and the batter was made from barley and oats, as opposed to today’s leavened waffles made from wheat flour.  Way back in England in the 14th century Middle Ages, the waffles were sold on the streets by vendors known as waferers.

Despite all this, waffles are immensely popular in Scandinavia – and have been for centuries.  Nope, not the potato kind of waffles so popular across the Atlantic and not the thick heavy waffles so popular in the low lands of Northern Europe (Belgium, Germany and Holland), but a humble heart-shaped waffles: not too sweet but very light and crisp.  The Scandinavian waffle, although not originating from there, is still very traditional and our version is usually only made on our shores.  We made it our own.

International waffle day (Våffeldag) is on 25th March every year.  Especially celebrated in Sweden, (where this day of waffle wonder originated), the day has religious connotations as it coincides with the Feast of the Annunciation, signalling the beginning of spring and lighter days.  On this day, people all over Sweden tuck into waffles with jam and whipped cream.

Still, nowhere are waffles as popular as in Norway where they are enjoyed all year round.  Every house has at least one waffle iron and a family recipe - and it is the perfect quick-snack to whip up when the family comes to visit.  In Norway, waffles are served one of two ways: sour cream and jam – or, more popular, with brown cheese.

Cheese with waffles, you say?  Really?  And goat’s cheese at that?  Yeps.  It is about as Norwegian as you can possibly get without standing on a soapbox singing “Take on Me”.

This recipe is by Farmor Eva from Sweden.  We sneakily took a copy of her handwritten cookbook after tasting these.

If you don’t have a heart-waffle iron, you can buy them online at Amazon or similar places.   We’ve even seen them at Robert Dyas.

Farmor Eva Aurell’s Waffles

This is a good basic recipe for waffles.  There are thousands of different versions for waffles – this is a good version from which to add your own personal preferences, such as different spices and maybe even soured cream to the mix.

Note:  you need a heart shaped waffle iron for these waffles.  If making them in a different waffle iron, you may need to increase the dough quantity as Belgian waffles are thicker than Scandinavian waffles.

250 ml water

250 ml whole milk

320g plain flour

2 tsp baking powder

150 ml melted margarine or butter

Mix a bit of liquid with the flour and baking powder to form a paste (to avoid lumps), then whisk in the rest of the flour and liquid.  Add the melted butter.  Leave to stand while you heat up the waffle iron.

Add enough batter to the waffle iron to cover the heart shaped surface, close the lid and cook until golden brown.  Repeat over until all batter is used.

Waffles are best eaten as they are cooked or they go soggy.  Enjoy with whipped cream and jam or with slices of Norwegian brown cheese.

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220px-Waffle_Maker

 

February 08, 2012

How to annoy the Norwegians...

We couldn't think of anything.  Nada.

Zip.

Except eating the last melkesjokolade  from Freia, that really gets them annoyed.

New Norwegian delivery just arrived this morning - the shelves will soon be full of Mills Kaviar, more Freia chocolate that you can shake a stick at, Smash, Nora jams, brunost brown cheese...  And much, much more.

To order online just click here

Otherwise, pop by the store on Great Titchfield Street - we'd love to see you

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A very angry norwegian man.  Jonas stole his Melkesjokolade.

 

September 20, 2011

Handsome George Clooney

This is possibly Bronte's favourite ad of the week.  And she watches a lot of TV, so that is saying a lot.

The ad is for a Norwegian bank.  

May 10, 2011

10 random facts... about Norway

  1. Odd is a first name in Norway.  A boy's name.  It is not uncommon to meet a chap called Odd. 
  2. Bent is also a common name. 
  3. There's 25,000 km of coastline in Norway.  Trip to the beach, anyone?
  4. Norway has a town called "Hell"
  5. It is not uncommon to pay around £4-5,000 for a traditional Norwegian costume
  6. H.R.H. Crown Princess Mette Marit of Norway was a single Mum before marrying the Crown Prince.  We *heart* this new Royal freedom.
  7. Norway has no public debt.
  8. Norway gained independence from Denmark in 1814.
  9. Norway has a crude oil production of 2.14 million barrels per day
  10. Preikestolen is the coolest picnic spot in the world (probably best to leave the pet poodle at home)

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We wish all of our Norwegian friends a Happy 17th of May for Tuesday next week.  We shall be celebrating in the shop with Norwegian foods, cakes and flags and we may even play A-ha all day long.

 

 

April 15, 2011

Brown Cheese wonders

Brun3Cheese is cheese, you say.  Well, not quite so.  There is an army of tyrophiles across the world who will beg to differ when it comes to this kind of white stuff.

Except, this particular cheese is not white: It's brown. 

In Norway, and as far as we know Scandinavia is the only producer of this in the world, they enjoy something called Brunost - literally, brown cheese.  Guess what?  It IS brown.

The reason for it being brown is that when they boil milk, cream and whey for seevral hours, the water evaporates and the heat turns the milk sugar into caramal, giving the cheese its distinct taste and characteristics.  Brown cheese is usually made with goat's milk or a mixture of goat and cow's milk.

If you've never had brown cheese, it is a bit like trying Marmite for the first time:  you'll either love it or hate it.  Fortunately, most people love it.

It's a hard cheese - you need a good cheese slicer such as one of these to slice it. 

Enjoy it on crispbread or crackers - or, if you want to be super Norwegian, on warm waffles.  It's delicious.

We stock 4 kinds of brown cheese - you can buy them on our webshop

The mildest of the lovely brown cheeses (flotemysost) - try this one Flotemysost1

8562 For a bit of a medium taste, try this goats/cow version called Gudbrandsdalen

EkteGeitost
The more goat cheese loving crowd should go for the Ekte Geitost - Real Goast Cheese (750g)

N34404263102_1343590_1959 Or how about a spreadable whey butter from Sweden?  This is called Messmor.  Utterly delightful.

Click on the images of ze cheeses to be teleported directly to our online store.


Brun1

this is what all ladies in Norway look like. 

Mostly, the basket is full of brown cheese as well as kvikklunsj.  Maybe an orange too.

December 20, 2010

Extra stuff we have (yes, pinnekjøtt too...)

We found some extra pinnekojtt.  Actually, only 3 kg, but we have it.  We also have a few more flaeskestege (svinekam), a few more lutefisk and we still have heaps of hams.  First come, first served.

We also have prinskorv, we will have a few jars Den Gamle Fabrik Kirsebaersovs and brunkager, pebernoedder and marcipan from Odense.

Pop by - we're open until 19:00 on the 23rd when we close for Christmas (open again on 4th Jan).

Bye for now

The Kitchen People

x

December 05, 2010

WE ARE OPEN TODAY SUNDAY 5th DECEMBER

Morning.

Just checking in to see if we're open?  Oh yes we are - from 11 till 17.  And yes, we have glogg (Blossa mulled wine) and yes we have hams, julebrus, julmust, remoulade, flaeskesteg, aebleskiver, risengrod, cherry sauce...  Everything.

Today we'll be doing a special Sunday Menu of Christmas Platters (choose from Danish or Swedish) for £9.95.  

Desserts today are Ris a la mandes with cherry sauce, Kladdkaka, lussekatter, cinnamon buns, cranberry and orange cake with spiced drizzle, seasonal tart and our amazing banana cake.

See you at the shop soon.  Don't be late.

Oh, and yes, so far, there are still parking spaces just outside the shop.  So get in that car pronto.

Rebekka, Bronte, Astrid and Lovely Emilia xxx

 

May 17, 2010

Eating Eurovision 2010

Smor

We’ve been inundated with enquiries from people who are putting on Eurovision parties and want to serve their guests Norwegian Food. 

Norwegian cuisine is full of amazing food – but when it comes to serving a spread for an evening of cheesy music and neighbour-voting, we do suggest you stay clear of the ultra traditional stuff such as dried, salted lams leg (Fenalar) and perhaps go easy on the brown cheese.   A lot of Norwegian food can be acquired taste and your guests may not necessarily appreciate it if they’ve never eaten it before.

Our suggestion for stuff you could serve:

Norwegian crisps Go for Potetchips either ready salted or paprika flavour.  Add maybe a bag of Cheez Doodles (they are Swedish but sold all over Scandinavia.  A bit like WotsIts but better).

DipMix A powdered mix, either “Holiday” flavour or “Dill” is good.  Mix this powder with crème fraiche and dip your crisps into it.  Yes, really. 

Chocolate Norwegian chocolate is superb.  Truly delicious.   If going for smaller bars of chocolate, we recommend Stratos (like an Aero bar but creamier), KvikkLunsj (like a Kit Kat but with real chocolate) and Melkesjokolade – literally, bars of Milk chocolate from the brand Freia.  Best of all is a bag of chocolate called Smash:  in short, corn snacks covered in milk chocolate.  We’re yet to meet anyone who does not like this.  In fact, everybody becomes addicted.  It’s expensive stuff (even in Norway, and that says a lot) so be prepared to feed your addiction by selling off your Granny’s TV set and Ebay’ing your prized collection of signed ABBA records.  You have been warned.

Savoury stuff  You could make some nice “Smorbrod” Norwegian style (Norwegian open Sandwiches).  These are similar to the Danish ones, but are not made on rye bread and they don’t have too much frilly stuff on top.   Read more here .  Use a whole meal crusty loaf as a base.

We suggest toppings such as Norwegian smoked salmon with scrambled egg (cold), Meatballs with Lingonberry jam and, in place of the Fenalar dried lamb, you could get away with Serrano ham (but don’t tell anyone Norwegian).  Liverpate with cucumber is another extremely popular topping – as is Jarlsberg cheese.

Really authentic stuff:  Make waffles and top these with sliced brown cheese.  It’s rather lovely.

If you pop by and want to stock up on a selection of truly Norwegian goods, just ask anyone of the nice people in the shop and they’ll be glad to help out.

Smash

January 19, 2010

Nordic Diet by Trina Hahnemann

Trina

Our boys and Trina (with some jars of red cabbage in the background)
 

We love Trina, she writes really nice books about Scandinavian food.  This instantly makes her one of our favourite people, seeing as we're all about spreading the herring-word around the planet.

Her first book, Scandinavian Cookbook, was lush - and the photos by Lars Ranek were amazing.  Her new book, just published this month by Quadrille, is all about the Nordic Diet and how to follow it and maybe, just maybe, end up looking a bit like Helena Christensen (maybe, only maybe).

Trina popped by on Monday to say hello to us and to sign a few books.  The Scandi Kitchen guys were all very pleased, as you can see.

To be in with the chance of winning a SIGNED copy of the NORDIC DIET book, answer the following question:

The infamous 80's rock band Europe had a poodle haired lead singer.  What was his name?

A: Joey Tribiani

B: Joey Tempest

C: Joey the Pink Poodle

Send your answer to iloveherring@scandikitchen.co.uk before Friday this week and we'll enter you into the competition.  The usual rules apply (no cheating, no cash alternative, only one winner, no you can't swap your prize for an evening out with Henrik, although he will sign the book as well if you request it).

If you fancy seeing Trina in action, she is hosting a cooking event at the most excellent Divertimenti on 30th January - it is only £40 a head www.Divertimenti.co.uk

Nordic1


May 05, 2009

Scandinavian Kitchen catering

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Did you know we also do catering?  Indeed, we serve lots of fantastic companies across the capital with Scandinavian food - from traditional open sandwiches to lighter snack lunches to canapes and breakfast meetings. 

It is not only Scandinavian companies that use our services - we've catered for hundreds of different companies, from the BBC to film production companies and banks such as Goldman Sachs - and big events like "the International Wine Challenge".  We count all the Scandinavian Embassies and Chambers of Commerce amongst our customers - as well as big companies such as Bang & Olufson, Kvadrat, Handelsbanken and many, many others.  On top of that we have lots of regular private customers who use our services catering for big family events and parties.

In a recent survey to our customers, 100% said they would use us again.  (Parp, parp, that was our trumpet blowing.)

If you fancy chatting to us about our catering, give us a ring or send a mail to iwantfood@scandikitchen.co.uk and we'll get back to you promptly. 

Party catering can be bespoke - as is breakfast meetings and buffets.  Here's a taster of our lovely open sandwiches and canapes (again, we can amend to suit your particular event):

For canape suggestions click here  and for open sandwiches click here

'I used the Scandinavian kitchen delivery for an important presentation to clients and everyone absolutely loved it! The food was great quality and the presentation prefect! We are a Danish company so it was complete package! Thanks again, Julie at www.egecarpet.com"Excellent canapes. Good service from staff prior to event and canapes delivered on time.

"Excellent canapes. Good service from staff prior to event and canapes delivered on time."

"The food was excellent and there was only a couple of pieces leftover.  Everyone said how good it was.  We will definitely use you again. 
Sally at DnB NOR Bank ASA"

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tags: danish, food, catering, swedish, norwegian, london, corporate

December 07, 2008

Norwegian / Norst Ribbe

If you're a Norwegian looking for RIBBE for Christmas, we do not stock it (only lutfisk, pinnekjot, grandiosa pizza and everything else) - but you can order RIBBE through these butchers:

Macken Brothers Family Butcher (ask for Rodney)
44 Turnham Green Terrace
Chiswick, W4
Tel. 020 8994 2646

John Charles the Village Butcher (ask for Dave or Ken)
12 Blackheath Village
Blackheath, SE3
Tel. 020 8852 0470

November 25, 2008

Norwegian Food - God jul!

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Our Norwegian Christmas foods are coming in this Thursday.  Here is a list of the main things we are getting in - from Pinnekjot to Bamsemums to Julebrus and Solo and Marcipangris...

Please do remember that we stock 600 products from all over Scandinavia and some things you may be looking for we have in the Swedish or Danish section if these are as good alternatives that offer you better prices - just ask if in doubt.

Download God Jul Norge

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