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14 posts categorized "Norway"

May 07, 2014

18 ways to be more Norwegian

We'll be celebrating Norwegian Constitution Day on 17th May along with the rest of Norway - so we thought we'd make a little selection of ways you can be more Norwegian:

 

1. When you 'gå på tur' (go for a hike) you always bring a Kvikk Lunsj and an orange. And you never,  EVER, allow anyone who isn't Norwegian to call your Kvikk Lunsj a 'Kit-Kat'.

Kvikklunsj 

 

2. Eat brunost. Enthuse about brunost. Wonder why no one else eats a brown cheese made from whey that looks like brown Plasticine but tastes of caramel and sheer happiness when sliced and put on top of warm waffles that you've made yourself in your heart-shaped waffle iron using batter you keep in your fridge for every occasion that requires waffles.

Vaffel_ost_wilfa

 

3. Eat a frozen pizza called the Grandiosa. Enthuse about a frozen pizza called the Grandiosa. The Grandiosa is the best pizza ever. Italy has nothing on the Grandiosa. Nothing.

F-Brødtekst-grandiosa

 

4. Sweden is good for one thing - the fleske-safari (meat safari). Meat is cheaper in Sweden, so it's worth crossing that border for meat. And booze. And everything else. Everything is cheaper in Sweden.

   Border

 

5. Sweden will never be better than Norway at anything. Apart from the price of everything. But of that you shall never speak openly.

  Swedes

(Denmark will never be better than Norway at anything. Apart from its easy availability of booze. Which you can talk about).  

 

6. Wear cool genser jumpers like this. Perfect for occasions such as being in temperatures of -20, Eurovision, fishing and crossing the border to acquire meat.

Jumper

 

7. Wear the 'bunad' national dress as if you were born in it. Yes, it itches, but that's part of the charm. You'll keep telling yourself. A lot.

Bunad

8. If you're well known for something, become a Norgesvenn - a famous friend of Norway. Norgesvenner in the past included the late Roald Dahl and Leroy from Fame. Today, Linda Evans from Dynasty, Bonnie Tyler and A1 have the honour.

Linda

 

9. In the summer, partake in a ‘Grillfest’. For this you should wear a ‘Grilldress’, which is a shellsuit in bright colours. Also required: curly hair and a fake moustache, plus socks and sandals. Harry Enfield's Scousers are your style icons.

  Grilldress

 

10. Celebrate Taco Friday at home. Every Friday. Unless you’re having Grandiosa, then it’s okay not to have Tacos. TACOS!

SecondColumn

 

11. Eat boiled sheep’s head, dried lamb sticks or cod preserved in lye. And fermented trout - that you should also get down with. 

  Smalahoved-kalrotstappe

 

12. Hyttetur. Every weekend, go to a cabin. Any cabin. If you don’t have a cabin near a fjord, go to your garden shed, even if you live in a bedsit in Hackney. Also, on the way, make sure to repeat point 1. (If you're in Hackney, we sell Kvikk Lunsj at ScandiKitchen.)  Use motivating sentences such as 'Ut på tur, aldri sur' (literally: 'out on a hike, never angry').

  Hytte

 

13. Every summer, go to Syden for two weeks vacation. This basically just means ‘The South’. Copenhagen counts. Or Oslo, if you're from Trondheim.

Syden

 

14. Use the term ‘Utepils’, meaning ‘to sit outside and have a beer, even if the sun just came out four minutes ago’. We do that here in the UK too, but we don't have the word for it.

Utepils

Utepils Photo Richard Sagen 

 

15. Flags. Celebrate your flag, every day of the year and especially on 17th May. On this day, purchase seven more flags to your collection. Wave them all around. 

7012961-norske-flag

 

16. Norwegians are born with skis on their feet. Uncomfortable for the mothers, but useful once they learn to stand up and navigate down snow covered mountains. If you can’t ski, don’t move to Norway.

  Snow baby skiing

 

17. Enjoy your hotdog wrapped in a potato pancake. It's a thing.

Hotdog

 

And finally: 17th May - 'Syttende Mai'. 

Celebrate Norway's national day on 17th May. No exceptions.

You are proud of Norway. 17th May is the most important day of the year, better than Christmas, birthday and Eurovision put together. The Norwegian Constitution Day is a day celebrated by all Norwegians and Norgesvenner (see above).

Get up, eat Norwegian food, wear a bunad (see above) sing songs about how much you love Norway. Wave flags around a lot. Ice cream. Waffles (see above). Brown cheese (see above). Repeat. Follow with alcohol (possibly purchased in Sweden). Forget how you got home, but wake up loving Norway even more than before.

Happy 17th May, everybody - see you at the ScandiKitchen or the park.

17.mai_london 

December 11, 2013

Sankta Lucia - the festival of light

Swedish Lucia For Dummies from Sweden on Vimeo.

This Friday the 13th December is the day of St Lucia and the festival of light. On this day across Scandinavia you will find processions of boys and girls dressed all in white bearing candles and singing carols. This is usually done in the morning darkness, welcoming the light. 

At the front of each procession is a Lucia Bride, wearing a wreath or crown on her head with four or five candles.

On this day, we drink ‘Glögg’ mulled wine and eat either saffron buns (Lussebullar) or little pancake balls called ‘Æbleskiver’. We also over-do the ginger biscuits. Really, way too many ginger biscuits...

The history of St Lucia can be traced back to St Lucia of Syracuse, a martyr who died in 304 – however, the date of St Lucia is also a pagan date.  It was the darkest night where spirits were free to roam and animals begin to talk. So, light was needed to ward of spirits. today's tradition is a bit of a blend of the two.

On Friday we will be serving Glögg and Saffron buns all day and playing carols on repeat.  

Lucia_i_Tivoli_805340a

November 29, 2013

Recipe: Lussebullar (Lucia Saffron buns)

No December in Sweden and Norway is complete without the delicious Lussebullar - a soft saffron bun. Perfect with Glogg mulled wine.

There are many, many different ways to make these buns. Some people add Kesella or quark to the mixture (it makes a more moist bun) - if you choose to do this, replace half the milk with quark or Kesella and follow the recipe as normal, except you add the quark when adding the soft butter.

Note: Our recipe uses ground saffron powder. It can be hard to get hold of in the UK - so if you use strands, gently grind them in a pestle & mortar and infuse them in the warm milk before using. 

Click here to download the pdf of the recipe 

1311_lussebullar1-1

 

November 21, 2013

Nordic Christmas Markets 2013 - this weekend 22, 23, 24 November

Julemarkede1

This week and weekend is on of the biggest in the Nordic ex-pat calendar. It’s the week of the Christmas Fairs.

We support these fairs wholeheartedly and we absolutely love going along and help if we can. The different organisation and Churches play a very important role to all Nordic ex-pats both for general support, religious support, as a meeting point, cultural centres and just simply nice places to be and visit.

Here’s the low down for this weekend’s markets in London:

Swedish Church Christmas Fair - Marylebone

A really wonderful and warm welcome to all at the Swedish Church in Harcourt Street. Open Thursday till 20:00 and all day Saturday and Sunday. We specifically recommend the traditional Glögg mulled wine, a secret recipe by The Reverend Mikael Persson, the Swedish Priest. Heavenly (Excuse the pun). We went to the pre-view yesterday and got our hands on Pippi Longstocking umbrellas and fancy knitted kid's strawberry hats!

Swedish Church is on Harcourt Street W1 - directions here www.swedishchurch.com

Norwegian Church Christmas Fair - Rotherhide

Everything from waffles to lompe, mulled wine and a lot of Norwegian ‘Jule’ cheer. The Norwegian Church in Rotherhide is a huge cultural centre for all things Norwegian – and Norwegian people and friends of Norway. The food market is huge and bulging with goodies.

ScandiKitchen will have a stand right outside the Norwegian Church where we will be serving hot mulled wine.

Sjømannskirkens Julebasar is on 22-24 November 10:00-18:00

How to get to the Norwegian Church (nearest tube Rotherhide) click here

Danish KFUK YMCA Christmas Bazaar – Hampstead

This event is a pilgrimage for a lot of ex pat Danes every year. It’s extremely busy and packed but worth a trip – they have everything from hotdogs to Christmas beers and real Danish ‘hygge’ feelings. They do a lot of decorations too – from calendar advent candles to ceramics so you can pick up a few prezzie.

Dansk KFUK’s Julebazar is on 23/24 November 10-17.  Find the Danish Bazar here

The Finnish Church in London Christmas Market

A warm welcome and genuine Christmas cheer awaits you at the Finnish Church in Rotherhide – everything from ‘squeaky cheese’ and Rye pastries with egg (Karelian Pies) and cinnamon buns as well as a huge food market. Open all this week until Sunday at 17:00.

ScandiKitchen will be there as we are part of the Scandi Christmas Market taking place between the Norwegian and Finnish church – so pop over and see us.

Nearest tube is Rotherhide; here’s a map Click here

Scandinavian Christmas Market 2013

Scan Events are doing the Scandi Christmas Market again this year in Rotherhide, outside the Finnish and Norwegian Churches.  Open Fri, Sat and Sun all day – pop by and say hello to us, we’ll also be there, selling hotdogs and warm mulled wine. Say hi to our team: Marte, Linnea, Jonas, Little Jonas, Torben and Kaisla.

More about Scandinavian Christmas Market here

Scandianavian_christmas_images

 

September 10, 2013

Sweet dreams are made of cheese (a mini-guide to Scandinavian cheeses)

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Many of us have memories of sitting in a field on a summer’s day eating crusty French bread and sharing a kilo of creamy brie.  In fact, some of us would like to spend most of our days doing just that, if it was not for the eventual need to then be moved around by a pick-up truck.

Less people have such glorious thoughts when thinking about Scandinavian cheese – in fact, most people associate Scandinavian cheese with Eurovision.  Except those of us who know just how many amazing cheeses actually come from our northern corner of the world.

Even back in the days when old Harold Bluetooth was a nipper and busy taking over the world, the Scandinavians made cheese.  In fact, the old Vikings had a diet rich in milk, butter and cheese and are even said to have found cheese to be a sexual stimulant.

Here’s a guide to some of the top Scandinavian cheeses

1.  Gammelost (Old cheese)
A recipe dating back to the Viking times, “Old cheese” needed very little help to mature.  Most people say both taste and smell resembles something that has spent a few months inside a sweaty old sock.  As you know, nothing pleases a true tyrophile more than a slice of stinky old sock. Admittedly, perhaps due to the taste, younger Norwegians are falling out of love with it, even if it is does have the nickname of Norwegian Viagra.

2.  Danablu (Danish Blue)
We had to include this as it is the most popular export and it is a darn fine cheese.  Invented originally to emulate Roquefort, and quickly making its own mark on the cheese scene, Danablu has a sharp, salty note and is excellent served on just about any kind of bread. Mash it with a bit of syrup to change its character and use it to spread on crisp bread, topped with some sunflower seeds – it really works.  Swedes tend to love blue cheese on ginger biscuits (we say don’t argue with anyone who invented Billy bookcases, Volvos and the zipper).

3.  Brunost (Brown cheese) 
Comes in many different varieties: the two best known are the Gudbrandsdalen (cow and goat) and Ekte Gjeitost (pure goat); the latter is the connoisseur’s choice

Okay, so it’s an acquired taste, but, on average, Norwegians eat about 4 kilos each of this stuff a year so there must be something to it.  It’s as Norwegian as trolls and fjords.  It looks a bit like a block of plasticine, tastes a bit like caramel and is enjoyed on its own, on open sandwiches or with freshly baked waffles:  all you need then is a patterned jumper and people will soon start calling you Haakon.

4.  Rygeost (smoked cheese)
A very Danish invention that is never exported due to its very short shelf life.  Unmatured, smoked cheese made from buttermilk and milk and turned in less than 24 hours, after which it is smoked very quickly over a mixture of straw and nettle and topped with caraway seeds.  This cheese is simply amazing, light and divine eaten on a piece of rye bread.  Resembles a firm ricotta in texture.

5. Vasterbotten
If ABBA is the queen of cheese, Vasterbotten is the king.  A firm, crumbly, aged Swedish cheese not unlike parmesan in smell but with immense flavour and character.  This cheese is a welcome addition to any cheeseboard and is also a partner to any crayfish party.  Can also be used to make the excellent Vasterbotten pie.

6. Hushallsost 
A cheese that has a name that translates as “household cheese” sounds like it belongs on a value shelf in a corner shop in Hackney, but it is actually an excellent cheese.  Mild, creamy, full of holes, this cheese is usually a big hit with the younger generation.  Hushallsost is one of six Swedish food products with a so-called TSG protection (one other cheese, Svecia, also holds this distinction).  Taste-wise it is a bit like the Danish Havarti cheese in texture (the Danes’ favourite and widely available in the UK), although less creamy.  Produced by Arla, Havarti is called Aseda Graddost in Sweden.  In Finland, the Turunmaa cheese is what is closest to Havarti in taste.

7.  Gamle Ole (Old Ole)
A sliceable mature Danish cheese, this baby stinks.  Don’t touch it too much or your fingers will honk all day.  The taste, however, is really lush.  Also known in Denmark as Danbo 45, there are many varieties in the same vein:  ‘Sorte Sara’ is a good version too.  A superb finish to any smorgasbord, eat a slice or two on sourdough bread topped with some lingon jam.  Other excellent strong Danes include Esrom 45 as well as Viggo Mortensen (he’s not a cheese, but he sure looks very strong).

8.  Präst ost (Priest cheese)
Sweden’s most popular cheese.  It was given its name because the farmers at the time it was invented could pay their church taxes in dairy products.   Präst ost comes in many varieties, from the mild to the mature and flavoured with anything from vodka to whisky.

9. Leipäjuusto (also known as “squeaky cheese”)
This is a fresh young cheese from Finland.  The milk is curdled and set into a flat round shape, then baked.  In the olden days it was dried for months and people put it on the fire to re-activate it.  The name comes from the sound it makes when you bite into it.  The taste is not unlike feta.

10. Rejeost (Prawn cheese)
For some reason, spreadable prawn cheese is immensely popular across all of Scandinavia.  Not really a great cheese from a connoisseur’s point of view, but surely any product that manages to combine cheese and prawns and make it taste good needs a mention.  If cheese and prawn can be coupled in peaceful harmony, then there’s hope for world peace.

Shop for cheese here 

August 21, 2013

Kransekage / Kransekake - the traditional Nordic celebration cake

Karenskitchen
Kransekage / Kransekake literally means ‘ring cake’. It’s a traditional Norwegian and Danish celebration cake (Weddings, Christenings, New Year’s Eve and National Days… ) made from baked marzipan, shaped into rings and then stacked as high as required. It’s very rich so not much is needed (it’s usually served at the Coffee course – a bit as a petit four).

As you can imagine, a real kransekage is made from pure almond paste (nothing like the cheap stuff used for normal cake decorating). It’s a hard cake to make, taking many hours of shaping, baking and decorating.

We don’t make these at Scandikitchen – but we get asked about these cakes a lot and we recommend our good friend Karen from Karen’s Kitchen.

You can contact Karen’s Kitchen via her facebook page right here or ping her an e-mail.  She's vry nice and super skilled in this department. In fact, she makes great cakes for all occasions. Tell her we said 'Hi'.

If you're thinking of making your own, this is the type of marzipan you need to make the real deal: Click here to buy Anton Berg 60% 'ren rå' marzipan 

May 10, 2013

'17 Mai' Celebrations in London 2013 - Norwegian National Day

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17th May is the most important day in the Norwegian calendar. The National Day, celebrating the Norwegian Contitution, is a massive event across the world for all Norwegians and ex-pat Norwegians.

In London, the celebrations take place mainly at Southwark Park (SE16).  It starts at 9 am with the raising of the Norwegian flag and carries on all though out the day with parades, singing, food, rinks and general celebrations.

Read more here

At ScandiKitchen, we celebrate with Norwegian food and fun all week.

We've filled our shelves with Norwegian foods and we may even find the old A-ha play list.

Through the week, we'll be selling Norwegian special open sandwiches and cakes.

We'll be serving Norwegian Hotdogs all Friday and Saturday - and all day Friday we'll be dishing up Waffles topped with brown cheese or whipped cream (which ever you prefer).

Get hold of all your Norwegian foods here  - please order before Wednesday to guarantee delivery in time for the big day! If you miss the deadline, pop by the shop on Great Titchfield Street - we're open till 19:00 all weekdays and until 18:00 on Saturday and 16:00 on Sunday.

 

April 29, 2013

Tell all the Norwegians... Hotdogs: Pølse med Lompe this Friday and Saturday

If there is one thing we know it is that Norwegians miss the hotdogs from home.  Good old 'polser' sausages, wrapped in a Lompe potato lefse type pancake.  Stuffed with cripsy onions, ketchup and mustard.

Best enjoyed with a Solo soft drink - or a cold beer.

Friday and Saturday this week (3rd and 4th May 2013) we're kick-starting our 'We Love Norway' month with special Norwegian hotdogs on sale.

Get both a cold Tuborg beer or Solo AND a hotdog for just £5.  We're wondering if you can find the same offer cheaper in Oslo? Do let us know.  

Lompe12

November 23, 2012

Scandinavian Christmas Markets 2012 - (23,24,25 Nov 2012)

Julebasar_2011_fredag_152_primary 2

It's the weeked for ALL the Scandi Christmas Markets in London

(23rd, 24th and 25th November 2012)

Swedish Church, Harcourt Street, London - Sat and Sun 11-6 (sat), 12-5 (sun) LINK HERE

Norwegian Church, St Olav's Square, Rotherhide 11-5 (Fri), 10-6 (Sat), 12-4 (Sun) LINK HERE

Finnish Church in London LONTOON SUOMALAINEN MERIMIESKIRKKO, Rotherhide 12-8 (Fri), 10-6 (Sat), 11-5 (Sun) - also continues through out next week LINK HERE

Danish YMCA Julemarked 43 Maresfield Gardens, Hampstead, 11-5 (Sat), 10-4 (Sun) LINK HERE

The Scandinavian Christmas Market - Outdoor market with loads of Scandi stalls, foods, presents, krims krams and nice hyggelige people  - Rotherhide, outside Finnish and Norwegian Church (yes, we're there, selling mulled wine and gingrbread dough, biscuits, delicato and more) LINK HERE

All a bit too much?  Pop by our shop. We'll put the coffee on, save you a piece of cake and always have time for a few hugs.  We're open as normal 10-18 Saturday and 10-17 Sunday.

God Jul x

Swedi

Scandianavian_christmas_top

May 15, 2012

Weekly News 15 May 2012: The Norwegian Issue

Hello

This week's newsletter is out and it is ALL about Norway. 

All of it.  Totally.

Happy Norwegian National Day for 17th May

x


May 14, 2012

The Boy who owns the streets of Oslo

This chap is 17 (well, he might be 18 now, actually).  He owns the streets of Oslo with his mean drumming.

Even our Bronte likes him and she usually says most drumming is "just noise" (this is usually before she pour herself a nice glass of sherry and puts her slippers on).

Highlining the Trollveggen, Norway

Stunning photo by  Brano Beliancin.

Highlining-the-trollveggen-norway-19803-1323342457-65

How to wake a Norwegian kid...

We love this.  three year old Norwegian kid who loves his music.  Class.

Drunk Norwegian on ice

He's hammered.  Although we do suspect there may be a deal (or future deal) with this partcular vodka company...

Enjoy.  It's worth watching all the way through for maximum effect.

OUR NEWSLETTER


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